Ingo Strauch F'20, F'15

Ingo  Strauch
Professor
Section langues et civilisations de l'Asie du Sud

The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Grants for Critical Editions and Scholarly Translations 2020
Professor
Section langues et civilisations de l'Asie du Sud
Université de Lausanne
Edition and Study of Five Buddhist Manuscripts From Greater Gandhara

The project will bring to fruition the study of five important birch-bark manuscripts of the “Bajaur Collection”: 1. A Gāndhārī version of the Dakṣiṇāvibhaṅga-Sūtra from a Madhyamāgama (fragment BC 1) 2. A fragment of a Gāndhārī Prātimokṣasūtra (BC 13) 3. A manuscript with two Gāndhārī Karmavācanā formulae (BC 7) 4. A protective text featuring the nāga king Manasvin (BC 3) 5. The “Bajaur Mahāyāna Sūtra” (BC 2) (in collaboration with Andrea Schlosser) All texts will be published for a first time in the form of a critical edition, accompanied by a translation, a detailed evaluation of their relation to parallel texts in various languages of the Buddhist transmission (Pali, Sanskrit, Tibetan, Chinese) and a commentary. The project is carried out under the auspices of the project “Buddhist Manuscripts from Gandhara” in Munich. The results of the project will be published in the series “Gandharan Buddhist Texts.”

The Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Collaborative Research Fellowships in Buddhist Studies 2015
Professor
South Asian Studies
Université de Lausanne
From Vijayapuri to Sriksetra? The Beginnings of Buddhist Exchange across the Bay of Bengal as Witnessed by Inscriptions from Andhra Pradesh and Myanmar

The project will investigate the beginnings of Buddhist exchange across the Bay of Bengal based on the inscriptions of Vijayapuri (modern Nagarjunakonda) in India and Sriksetra (near modern Pyay) in Myanmar. Combining the expertise of five leading scholars from Europe and the United States, it will produce a state-of-the-art digital publication of these documents, and a volume of articles dealing with early Buddhist networks and the spread of Indian culture to Southeast Asia. Crossing the academic divide between South and Southeast Asia, it will make a key contribution to the decipherment of the Pyu language, address the challenge that early Buddhism in Myanmar poses to the notion of a ‘Sanskrit cosmopolis’, and refine current models of the diffusion of Buddhism across Asia.